Disability Insurance for Dentists Tips

Read these 7 Disability Insurance for Dentists Tips tips to make your life smarter, better, faster and wiser. Each tip is approved by our Editors and created by expert writers so great we call them Gurus. LifeTips is the place to go when you need to know about Disability Insurance tips and hundreds of other topics.

Disability Insurance for Dentists Tips has been rated 0.7 out of 5 based on 7 ratings and 1 user reviews.
As a New Dentist, What Insurance Coverage Should I Consider?

Insurance Coverage New Dentists Should Consider

As you start your professional career here are some types of insurance you should consider.

  • Professional liability insurance. You should purchase a level of coverage with which you are comfortable BEFORE you treat your first patient. Depending on your specialty and type of practice, the maximum coverage you need may vary.
  • Disability insurance for dentists. Even if you are covered to some level by a group policy, which represents low cost disability insurance for dentists (and possibly not the same level of benefit as an individual own occupation policy), you should consider purchasing individual coverage that protects your income stream and continues benefits until you are able to perform the duties of your specialty.
  • Supplemental medical insurance. Once again, even if you have group coverage, examine your benefits carefully. If you see any “gaps” in coverage, or less-than-acceptable provisions, consider purchasing a supplemental policy as part of your dentist's health program.
  • Life insurance. If, as is often recommended, you purchased some form of life insurance coverage while in dental school, you should consider increasing your limits now that you will be practicing your specialty. If you're starting your career without any life insurance, study the varieties of coverage and select a plan that works for you now and can be expanded in the future.
Should you become the owner of a practice or a partner in one, give strong consideration to purchasing disability business overhead expense insurance. As a companion of your dentist disability coverage, this policy will help reimburse you for the ongoing expenses of your practice should you become disabled.

Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
As a Dental School Student, Can I Find Dentist Disability Insurance to Cover Me Until I Start Practicing?

Dentist Disability Insurance Is Available for Dental School Students

Dental school students can often find dentist disability insurance to cover them while they are still enrolled. While your income may be modest, during your dental school career, you still have expenses that continue in the event of a disability. There is some low cost disability insurance for dentists who are still in the education phase.
These could prove to be a financial lifesaver should you become disabled. Most of the plans offered normally pay from $1,000 to $2,000 per month should you suffer a covered disability. Most student plans require some or all of the following to qualify for disability eligibility:

  • Unable to continue your dental studies for a minimum of 60 to 90 days
  • Coverage will extend for up to around 24 months, with extensions allowed under certain circumstances
  • No medical exam is normally required if you are under a stated age (35, 40, etc.). If you are over the stated age, you may have to provide proof of your medical history to qualify
  • Your student plan may be convertible to a full dentist disability insurance policy, if this provision is included in your coverage
Student loan payments and other regular expenses, if you suffer an injury or illness that prohibits you from pursuing your dental studies for some period of time, will continue during your disability. For a reasonable cost, you should consider this coverage while you're still in dental school.

If you're a dental resident you may be able to purchase disability insurance for a resident dentist while you're in residency. The amounts offered are often more than your current income since they reflect the likelihood that you will have substantially more income when you go into practice. Since the premium is locked in to age 65 on the better policies this is a recommended and prudent financial action.
Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
What Factors Are Commonly Considered When I Apply for Dentist Disability Insurance?

Commonly Considered Factors When You Apply for Dentist Disability Insurance

Here are some of the factors that you should consider when you look for a dentist disability insurance policy. These and possibly other factors can influence your eligibility for coverage and/or the rates you might be quoted.

  • Definition of disability. Do you want an “any-occupation” or an “own-occupation” type policy? One type of policy usually states that you've recovered from your disability when you become able to perform the duties of any gainful occupation. With “own-occupation” provisions, you are normally considered to be disabled until you can resume the duties of your specialty.
  • Non-cancelable or guaranteed renewable coverage. If you want this important provision usually included in most disability insurance for dentists coverage.
  • Age, gender, and health condition. You will not be surprised to learn that these factors weigh heavily in your eligibility and/or cost for protection.
  • Your specific specialty. Own occupation coverage on some of the better disability insurance for dentists further expand the definition to defining your occupation (own occupation coverage) to disability coverage in your specialty. For example, if you're an orthodontist and cannot practice orthodontistry because of illness or accident then the claim would be paid (subject to insurance company approval).
  • Options, riders, and extra provisions. An additional feature you want such as residual (partial) disability. Many policies also include or offer: presumptive disability, inflation protection, and a future disability option (ability to increase limits without medical exam).
There may be other factors, including the financial rating of the insurance company you're considering that are important in the choice of your coverage. Use informative websites like ProtectYourIncome.com to get all the information you need to find the best dentist disability insurance program for you.

Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
Why Does It Appear That Disability Insurance for Dentists Is More Expensive than Life Insurance?

Disability Insurance for Dentists Could Be More Expensive than Life Insurance

“Why does it appear that disability insurance for dentists is more expensive than life insurance?” This question is often asked as people look at the sometimes large lump sum payouts for life insurance versus a modest monthly disability benefit. The answer is actually quite simple. The odds are higher that, during your professional career, you are more likely to suffer an injury or illness and become disabled than you are to die. Also, the total benefit paid from the time of disability to age 65 could total in the millions of dollars. A $10,000 per month disability claim paid from age 45 to age 65 would pay $2,400,000.

The insurance industry, as you probably know, establishes cost and premium structures based on statistics. The more covered claims filed and amount of benefit payouts often translate to higher premiums, while fewer claims and less dollars paid out often result in lower premiums for the same coverage.

Your goal of low cost insurance can still be realized. However, you should give serious consideration to your dentist disability insurance package of protection, making sure that it is adequate for your needs. Unlike life insurance, which is a more “black-and-white” situation, disability insurance for dentists resides in a much “grayer” area of coverage versus benefit.

If, through injury or illness, you become disabled for a period of time and unable to practice your specialty, leaving your monthly income stream unprotected or under-protected could generate a financial crisis. With recent statistics projecting that one of seven people will suffer a disability before the age of 65, dentists reside in this statistical universe. When managing your dentist cost issues, give serious consideration to protecting an even more important category -- your monthly income stream.

Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
When Is It Wise to Consider Getting Supplemental Dentist Disability Coverage?

Consider Getting Supplemental Dentist Disability Coverage

Your decision to consider supplemental insurance to enhance your existing dentist disability insurance coverage should be based on a few of the following important factors.

  • Is your current plan a group or individual coverage program? Group coverage, paid for by the employer, means that the 50 to 60% income benefit is normally taxable, reducing your real disability income to 35 to 45% of your regular gross amount. This is rather low cost disability insurance for dentists; but it may leave much to be desired when you need benefits.
  • There are association dentist disability insurance plans that you might currently have or are considering. Make sure to verify what happens to rates in the future in these plans. Are the rates guaranteed to age 65 as they are in the better dentist disability insurance policies? Are the definitions as good as the private dentist disability insurance policies?
  • Have you seriously considered what level of protection would provide you with consistent piece of mind as you practice your specialty? To perform your duties at the high level you've come to expect, a minimum of stress and a maximum of piece of mind can be important components to a successful practice. Disability insurance for you as a dentist can help you achieve that piece of mind.
Supplemental insurance coverage to enhance your package of protection can give you more confidence that your standard of living will not be materially affected should you suffer a disability.

Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
Since I’m In Practice for Myself, Should I Combine Disability Insurance for Dentists with Business Expense Coverage?

Combine Disability Insurance for Dentists with Business Overhead Expense Coverage

If you're in practice for yourself, or even if you are a partner in a larger practice, you should consider linking dentist disability insurance with business overhead expenses coverage as part of your dentist health program. While maintaining your personal income stream is a top consideration, you are also a businessperson if you are in private practice. And it's wise to think like a businessperson as well as a medical professional.

Should you suffer an injury or illness that renders you unable to practice your specialty, even if you sufficiently protect your personal income stream with disability insurance for dentists, where will the funds come to maintain the following items?

  • Office rent or mortgage payments
  • Utility (electricity, gas, telephone, etc.) expenses
  • Debt service payments for dental equipment
  • Compensation, including taxes, for your employees
When you have recovered from your disability, you want to ensure that you have a practice to return to. By protecting your practice's overhead expenses as part of your insurance for dentists program, you'll have the piece of mind – and the funds – to maintain your practice while you recuperate.

Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
Is Dentist Disability Insurance Available for Most Specialties?

Dentist Disability Insurance Is Available for Most Specialties

Disability insurance for dentists often allows you to purchase the options available for physicians. While some of these options may appear to be a substantial investment at first, as with most medical professionals your regular income stream is your most important asset and should be protected at all times. With current statistics indicating that as many as one in every seven people will suffer a five-year disability before the age of 65, the maintenance of your income is a critical consideration.

If you have your own practice or are a partner in one, you should consider matching your dentist disability insurance with some disability business overhead expenses coverage. In the event you suffer a disability, you'll want to keep your practice, including office expenses and personnel costs, functioning as usual so it (and they) will be there when you're ready to resume your specialty.

Refer to your insurance policy contract for specific information regarding your coverage and for actual terms, conditions and exclusions. The above statements are general in nature and may or may not reflect the actual terms of your insurance policy.

   
Not finding the advice and tips you need on this Disability Insurance Tip Site? Request a Tip Now!


Guru Spotlight
Susan Sayour